Selous Game Reserve

Wildlife highlight: It is UNESCO World Heritage Site with unusual antelope species like sable and puku, masai giraffes, wildebeest, lions, elephants,lions, wild dogs, hyenas, zebras, leopards and black rhinos among others.

 What it is like to be here

Selous’ landscape is like a scene out of a destination marketing video, with shaggy-topped African fan palms, luscious-green bogs and dead trees submerged in flowing rivers. Nature is in its wildest form at this Savannah park which is made of grasslands, wetlands and extensive bamboo woodlands.

At this UNESCO World Heritage Site, you will experience the real thrill/vibe of being in a safari. You have to work a bit harder for your game sightings–unlike in a zoo where you just walk in and find animals in cages. Here, they have freedom to wander and guess what…..it is as huge as 55,000 Km2 (19,000 sq mi). That’s why it is known as Africa’s biggest game reserve. You could spend an entire day touring around. Luckily, you are free to wander off the beaten track as it is a game reserve. Even better, our driver guide is very adept at finding the animals without scaring them off.

This maximizes your chances of seeing unusual antelope species like sable and puku, masai giraffes, wildebeest, lions, elephants, lions,wild dogs, hyenas, zebras, leopards and black rhinos among others.

Considering that the Southern wing of the park is designated for sports hunting, we’ll forcus on the Northern wing of the park, where photographic enounters are in plenty. The most pronounced feature here is River Rufigi, a confluence of Kilombero and Luwegu rivers. It is 600kms long. A favourite activity here is a guided boat cruise which presents a rewarding opportunity to see countless crocodiles, hippos and a variety of water birds. You also see the largest land mammals in the world, elephants. Selous used to harbour around 70,000 in 2010. Over the year, it has declined to rough 15,000 due to a fresh outbreak of commercial poaching

A walking safari in Selous is a must for that exciting feeling you get when near elephants or giraffe on foot. You will spot lots of surprises you’d have missed out on if you stayed in the car. These include overlooked birds, butterflies, insects and mammals.

A visit to Selous is incomplete with a stopover at the grave site Sir Frederick Selous, a famous early conservationists after whom the reserve is named.

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